Sony launches head-mount image processing unit for endoscopic image display

Sony has launched a head-mount image processing unit capable of receiving and outputting endoscopic image signals or controlling video images which can be displayed on a monitor in 2D or 3D. The unit enables surgeons to move freely as they perform their procedure.

Jul 31st, 2013
Content Dam Vsd Online Articles 2013 07 Sony Head Mount

A new head-mount image processing unit from Sony is capable of receiving and outputting endoscopic image signals or controlling video images which can be displayed on a monitor in 2D or 3D.

In conventional laparoscopic surgical procedures, surgeons use an external monitor to perform surgery, but Sony’s head-mounted display enables surgeons to position themselves flexibly as they perform their procedure while providing the benefit of 3D image display.

The unit uses 1280 x 720 organic light-emitting diode panels to enable extremely detailed image representation of the target area, according to the Sony press release. A panel is fitted for each eye in the head mount and independent HD images are displayed on each panel with no crosstalk, which helps to display accurate stereoscopic images of the target area.

Built-in picture in picture enable a second image to appear as a window while the image from the laparoscope is kept as the main image. In addition, the unit can flip images to the left or rate, or rotate them 180° in order to view them from each individual’s standing position, regardless of the orientation of the endoscopic camera.

Sony’s new monitor is also able to switch between 2D and 3D images, depending on the type of endoscope, by simply selecting the “input” button on the unit. As a result, the unit is compatible with both 2D and 3D endoscopes.

While the product has been approved in Japan, its launch in other countries has yet to be confirmed.

View product specifications and more in the Sony press release.

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