Tomographic techniques provide 3-D radar signatures

Because two-dimensional (2-D) Fourier transforms require data to be orthogonally aligned and evenly spaced, they must be resampled to a Cartesian grid before they can be processed. This resampling often leads to data loss and loss of resolution in radar images.

Tomographic techniques provide 3-D radar signatures

--Andrew Wilson

Because two-dimensional (2-D) Fourier transforms require data to be orthogonally aligned and evenly spaced, they must be resampled to a Cartesian grid before they can be processed. This resampling often leads to data loss and loss of resolution in radar images.

Now, Craig Malek (cquest@ c quest.com ) at CompuQuest (Springfield, VA) has developed a technique that uses two-dimensional (2-D) interpolation techniques to eliminate loss of resolution in radar images. And, because the method samples radar in two dimensions, radar images can be reconstructed in three dimensions. To construct three-dimensional (3-D) images, radar data are collected at both surfaces of constant elevation and azimuth. By using bilinear and nearest-neighbor techniques, radar data are then reconstructed in 3-D sample space. Data are then interpolated to Cartesian coordinates using information from neighboring planes.

Malek has tested the technique on a test target of a 1/3 scale model C-29 aircraft with a 17.5-ft wingspan. Although there was loss of detail due to signal averaging, the nose contour is completely averaged in the image because it is shadowed by the rest of the aircraft.

More in Defense & Aerospace
The new Basler blaze camera
Sponsored
The new Basler blaze camera