Underwater camera gets funding

The Research & Development Corporation (RDC) has awarded SubC Control (Clarenville, Newfoundland, Canada) $115,957 to create an underwater single-lens reflex camera capable of taking high definition still photos and videos.

Underwater camera gets funding
Underwater camera gets funding

The Research & Development Corporation (RDC) -- an outfit responsible for improving Newfoundland and Labrador's R&D-- has awarded SubC Control (Clarenville, Newfoundland, Canada) $115,957 to create an underwater single-lens reflex camera capable of taking high definition still photos and videos.

The camera, which will mounted on a remotely operated vehicle (ROV), will allow underwater structures such as rigs and pipelines to be inspected.

The funding comes from RDC's Research and Development (R&D) Proof of Concept program, which aims to help small and medium-sized enterprises reduce the technical and financial risk of pre-commercial research and development projects.

Launched in 2010, SubC Control provides solutions for video, image and lighting requirements in the offshore and subsea markets.

More information about RDC's R&D proof of concept program can be found on the organization's web site here.

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-- Dave Wilson, Senior Editor, Vision Systems Design

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