Miniature IR camera flies in Aegis missile test

FEBRUARY 21--Thermoteknix (Cambridge, UK; www.thermoteknix.com) worked closely with a team from Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (Laurel, MD) to develop a multipurpose sensor payload that was integrated with the target missile to collect infrared (IR) and video imagery of the target's boost and postboost phases of flight.

Feb 21st, 2006

FEBRUARY 21--Thermoteknix (Cambridge, UK; www.thermoteknix.com) worked closely with a team from Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (Laurel, MD) to develop a multipurpose sensor payload that was integrated with the target missile to collect infrared (IR) and video imagery of the target's boost and postboost phases of flight, video coverage of the target's re-entry vehicle separation event, and spectral, radiometric, and video coverage of the intercept by a Standard Missile-3. The Thermoteknix MIRIC TB2-30 camera, selected for use on the target missile in the November 2005 Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) intercept test, provided real-time thermal imagery to the ground crew, with continuous imagery from launch to intercept.

"This provided scientists with the closest and clearest view of the intercept," said the project manager for Aegis BMD Test and Evaluation. "It will also enable scientists to better understand the phenomenon of postburnout motor debris associated with solid-fueled boosters."

The camera was installed in the aft-looking cluster to collect data on the booster's postburnout debris efflux.

Additional flights using the Thermoteknix MIRIC infrared cameras are planned for 2006.

More in Cameras & Accessories