KIA Motors increases bar code read rate

Korean auto giant KIA Motors has chosen Cognex (Natick, MA, USA) barcode readers to keep track of 2-D Data Matrix direct part marked (DPM) codes on its engine and transmission parts.

KIA Motors increases bar code read rate
KIA Motors increases bar code read rate

Korean auto giant KIA Motors has chosen Cognex (Natick, MA, USA) barcode readers to keep track of 2-D Data Matrix direct part marked (DPM) codes on its engine and transmission parts.

KIA Motors focused on enhancing the 2-D Data Matrix read rates of the parts after it shifted its production system to a six-speed transmission production line.

The company's conventional transmission production line produced approximately 1,800 units daily, but the system it had previously used only delivered 96-97 per cent read rates, while its engine line -- which produced 1,300-1,400 engines daily -- had read rates that were under 97 per cent.

Because KIA Motors' auto parts are assembled with anti-rust oil spray, one of the challenges for the reader to avoid is errors caused by oil on the code. In addition, the 2-D Data Matrix codes can be stained or damaged by dirt or scratches, even though they have been washed and kept clean. And, with the reduced marking size, the codes are very small and have greater variation in marking quality, making them more difficult to read.

In spite of these challenges, once KIA Motors had deployed Cognex Cognex In-Sight 5110 barcode readers with 2DMax+ code reading algorithms to identify the codes on parts on its 6-speed transmission production line, it achieved 99 per cent read rates.

KIA Motors has now installed the Cognex In-Sight 5110 in every transmission and engine component assembly spot. The car maker has also deployed the compact In-Sight Micro 1110 for small, narrow spaces.

In addition, KIA Motors installed the DataMan 8500 handheld readers as a backup system. The fixed-mount DataMan 100X barcode readers have also been used to check the quality of laser marks in the production line.

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