Intel addresses need for lower-cost, higher-performance Internet infrastructure

SEPTEMBER 4--Intel Corp. (San Jose, CA; www.intel.com) executives outlined ways for businesses to reduce their infrastructure costs while supporting ever-increasing demands for performance and bandwidth.

SEPTEMBER 4--Intel Corp. (San Jose, CA; www.intel.com) executives outlined ways for businesses to reduce their infrastructure costs while supporting ever-increasing demands for performance and bandwidth. In remarks to 4000 engineers and developers at the Intel Developer Forum (IDF), Gadi Singer, vice president of the Enterprise Platforms Group and general manager of the Enterprise Processors Division, highlighted the concept of "parallelism"--a way to use multiple parallel-computing resources at all levels from the enterprise down to the processor--as one important method for lowering costs while achieving high performance.

Singer said that for businesses to benefit from parallelism, they must follow three basic principles: deploy systems resources in a distributed fashion that allows more enterprise tasks to be processed in less time, deploy technologies that effectively manage concurrent execution and minimize idle time within enterprise system resources, and connect disparate systems through powerful, standards-based technologies that provide efficient new ways to connect servers in Internet data centers and clusters.

"To achieve greater enterprise computing efficiencies, today's businesses demand more than just raw speed," said Singer. "They must deploy a new breed of intelligent technologies that offer users multiple, simultaneous performance and cost benefits. Deploying those technologies in a parallel, scalable, and reliable manner across multiple servers and sites--and connecting them through high-speed links--is the key to success."

In the fast-growing metropolitan-area network segment, where large amounts of data travel over fiberoptic rings around large urban areas, the key to cost reduction is the use of optoelectronic modules. These modules integrate lasers and micro-optics and, when combined with transponders, convert electrical signals into fully formatted digital signals. Intel is working with customers to provide advanced technologies in this area to help customers reduce costs.

Visit developer.intel.com/idf for more on the IDF conference. For the latest information on technology developments throughout the year, visit Intel Developer Update at developer.intel.com/update.

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