Fish processed by vision system

Engineers at the Icelandic firm Valka (Kópavogur, Iceland) have designed a vision-based cutting machine that can cut out pin bones from red fish, as well as trim and portion the fish into fish fillets.

Nov 21st, 2012
Fish processed by vision system
Fish processed by vision system

Engineers at the Icelandic firm Valka (Kópavogur, Iceland) have designed a vision-based cutting machine that can cut out pin bones from red fish, as well as trim and portion the fish into fish fillets.

Developed in collaboration with the Icelandic processor HB Grandi, the machine uses a combination of x-ray and 3-D image processing techniques together with robot controlled water jets.

In testing carried out under the supervision of Syni Laboratory Service, the system was able to substantially reduce the wastage from the cutting process, roughly doubling the yield of fillets from the fish compared with manual cutting methods.

The tests also showed that a total of 94 per cent of the fillets processed by the machine were totally bone free. The company says that to completely ensure that all fillets produced on a production line would be completely bone free, a second x-ray machine can be placed on the line.

Valka is now testing the machine to determine its effectiveness in inspecting and portioning different species of fish such as pollock, cod and salmon.

Recent articles from Vision Systems Design that you might also find of interest.

1. Hyperspectral imaging checks cod for quality

A PhD student from the University of Tromsø in Norway has developed a hyperspectral imaging system that can automatically inspect cod fillets.

2. Cameras and computers count fish

Researchers at the University of Western Australia (Perth, Australia) led by associate professor Euan Harvey have been awarded a three-year, $450,000 Australian Research Council Linkage grant to develop a vision-based computer algorithm to count and measure fish.

3. Stereo system studies fish stocks

Researchers at NOAA’s National Marine Fisheries Service’s (NFMS) Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC; Seattle, WA, USA) have developed a system to determine the composition and size of fish species.

-- Dave Wilson, Senior Editor, Vision Systems Design

More in Factory