Deploying machine vision for food and beverage inspection

In a free webcast on March 14, John Salls, Owner/Engineer, Vision ICS, will discuss the ramifications of errors in food and beverage manufacturing processes and how deploying a vision system for inspection can prevent such issues.

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Food and beverage manufacturers are faced with increasingly stringent requirements when it comes to things such as contamination, traceability, safety, and overall quality.

Deploying machine vision technology into food and beverage inspection processes can save time and money while drastically minimizing these risks, so long as the machine vision system is properly deployed. In a free webcast on March 14, John Salls, Owner/Engineer, Vision ICS, will discuss the ramifications of errors in food and beverage manufacturing processes and how deploying a vision system for inspection can prevent such issues.

He will also discuss the enabling technologies, including cameras, lighting, algorithms and software, optical character recognition (OCR), optical character verification (OCV), and other components that go into a successful food and beverage inspection system.

The webcast will conclude with a question and answer period.

Webcast information:

Utilizing advanced vision technologies in food and beverage inspection
John Salls, Owner/Engineer, Vision ICS
March 14, 2018 11:00 AM EDT

Pictured: Food inspection: Vision system inspects, counts bakery products

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