Imaging developments push barriers

While system integrators are constantly improving existing machine-vision and imaging applications, other engineers and researchers are equally engrossed in extending the boundaries of imaging technologies. On the research side, for example, Robert Full at the PolyPEDAL Laboratory at the University of California at Berkeley is investigating animal and insect locomotion. Using high-speed camera and imaging techniques, reports contributing editor Shari Worthington, Full`s studies are providing bio

Feb 1st, 1998

Imaging developments push barriers

George Kotelly Executive Editor

georgek@pennwell.com

While system integrators are constantly improving existing machine-vision and imaging applications, other engineers and researchers are equally engrossed in extending the boundaries of imaging technologies. On the research side, for example, Robert Full at the PolyPEDAL Laboratory at the University of California at Berkeley is investigating animal and insect locomotion. Using high-speed camera and imaging techniques, reports contributing editor Shari Worthington, Full`s studies are providing biological stimulus for computer animation and the design of multilegged robots (see p. 30).

A teacher`s research experiments with weather-satellite systems using ham-radio equipment are providing Maine school children with access to meteorological data and real-time imagery. As discussed by contributing editor John Haystead, a PC-based weather-satellite downlink and a display station are introducing students to weather patterns, oceanic movements, and image processing (see p. 40).

In the generation of new imaging inspection techniques, a reverse-geometry x-ray system is detecting cracks in aircraft wing sections more quickly, accurately, and conveniently than available methods. According to contributing editor Larry Curran, this novel system also eliminates the need for x-ray film (see p. 24).

Another new technology, contends editor at large Andy Wilson, called digital video or versatile disk (DVD), is anticipated to become the next-generation of optical-disk-storage media. Although similar in shape and size to compact disks, the more-efficient DVDs can store more than seven times their storage capacity (see p. 52).

In the past, says Wilson, analyzing imaging signals with wavelet transforms was executed only by researchers and academics via complicated software tools. Today, however, several companies are providing off-the-shelf signal-processing software packages containing wavelet theory, functions, and utilities (see p. 46).

To help you design, develop, and integrate machine-vision and imaging systems, refer to our new Vision Systems Design Buyers Guide (see p. 59). It contains extensive listings of imaging products, manufacturers, and acronyms.

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