Robotic system identifies landmines

Researchers at the Department of Computer and Communications Engineering at the American University of Science and Technology (Beirut, Lebanon) have developed a vision system for a landmine detecting robot.

Robotic system identifies landmines
Robotic system identifies landmines

Researchers at the Department of Computer and Communications Engineering at the American University of Science and Technology (Beirut, Lebanon) have developed a vision system for a landmine detecting robot.

The robot first scans the ground to determine whether a mine exists or not. A camera then captures images of the scanned area which are digitally processed to reduce noise and enhance the features in the images.

After enhancement, an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) -- which has been previously trained with images containing the objects to be recognized -- is used in order to identify, recognize and classify the make and model of a landmine.

The researchers claim that the robotic system was able to identify and classify different types of landmines under various conditions (rotated landmine, partially covered landmine) with a success rate of up to 90 per cent.

Researchers Roger Achkar and Michel Owayjan published the results of their work in the September 2012 issue of the International Journal of Artificial Intelligence and Applications (IJAIA. Their article can be found here.

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