Vision Systems Design colaunches conference

The first annual Intelligent Vision `99 technical conference, scheduled to be held at the Marriott Hotel, Santa Clara, CA, June 28 and 29, 1999, is being sponsored and organized by Vision Systems Design and Image Processing Europe magazines. It is the first comprehensive technical conference on emerging and advanced machine-vision and image-processing technologies, applications, trends, and system integration opportunities and will offer both technical sessions and tabletop exhibits. Target atte

May 1st, 1999

Vision Systems Design colaunches conference

George Kotelly Executive Editor

georgek@pennwell.com

The first annual Intelligent Vision `99 technical conference, scheduled to be held at the Marriott Hotel, Santa Clara, CA, June 28 and 29, 1999, is being sponsored and organized by Vision Systems Design and Image Processing Europe magazines. It is the first comprehensive technical conference on emerging and advanced machine-vision and image-processing technologies, applications, trends, and system integration opportunities and will offer both technical sessions and tabletop exhibits. Target attendees include designers, developers, OEMs, researchers, and volume users of vision systems, as well as technology, industrial, information, engineering, medical, and scientific managers. These professionals need to know how these systems are becoming more robust, accurate, and reliable as more-powerful hardware and software are being developed and incorporated.

The more than 20 session speakers are experienced industry experts, technologists, and executives who are directly responsible for the building of innovative machine-vision and image-processing systems for all types of applications. They will present novel, in-depth, incisive information that will enable attendees to keep pace with the dynamic and expanding vision market; cope with the expected surge in new technologies, products, and applications; and empower their decision-making process.

Meanwhile, as reported in this issue, machine-vision systems continue their assault on imaging accuracy and performance barriers. As reported by contributing editor Winn Hardin, an innovative optical processing system is expected to be able to screen several mammograms in about one minute with an accuracy that exceeds that of a radiologist and costs less than available methods. Automobile manufacturers are now applying a patented optical image-enhancement system, says contributing editor John Haystead, that can inspect reflective surfaces and measure surface anomalies to a few microns.

University researchers, says editor at large Andy Wilson, are modifying conventional 2-D ultrasound imaging systems to generate volumetric data of the inner structures of the human body. This is resulting in sharper visualizations and more accurate diagnoses. To optimize vision-system accuracy, repeatability, and speed, says Andy, imaging-software suppliers are integrating gray-scale correlation with geometric-based approaches to overcome the typical problems found in many imaging applications.

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