StereoGraphics introduces autostereoscopic display

AUGUST 7--StereoGraphics Corp. (San Rafael, CA; www.stereographics.com) has introduced its first autostereoscopic display, the SynthaGram Monitor, which allows scientists, doctors, engineers, and other viewing audiences to see in stereo without wearing special eyewear.

AUGUST 7--StereoGraphics Corp. (San Rafael, CA; www.stereographics.com) has introduced its first autostereoscopic display, the SynthaGram Monitor, which allows scientists, doctors, engineers, and other viewing audiences to see in stereo without wearing special eyewear. The SynthaGram Monitor provides bright views with wide viewing angles, enabling simultaneous stereo viewing by several people. It will start shipping this month.

"StereoGraphics' autostereoscopic technology addresses two major trends in the visualization industry," said Lenny Lipton, founder and chief technology officer. "First, people want to view stereo images without wearing eyewear. Second, we can now offer a stereoscopic visualization solution to users of flat-panel displays to complement our existing products for cathode-ray-tube monitors. This new technology will be particularly attractive to venues such as museums, planetariums, and showrooms that wish to provide the most realistic viewing experience possible to their audiences."

As a result of true depth perception provided by Stereo3D technology, engineers and scientists can reduce time spent on graphical data interpretation and improve data understanding. This is critical to: computational chemists developing molecular models; design engineers involved in virtual prototyping; doctors and technicians in medical imaging; scientists and doctors in academic research; and, electronic game developers.

Supported by Windows Me/2000/NT/98 operating systems, the monitor includes a liquid-crystal-display panel; a lenticular screen; a software developers' kit; a viewer to play back the stereo images on the display; a graphics card with digital output adapter to ensure compatibility between the computer and the monitor; and software plug-ins enabling creation of autostereoscopic images within existing graphics software programs. Linux and Unix operating systems will be supported in future versions of the software-developers kit.

More in Home