Cameras help monitor construction

OxBlue (Atlanta, GA, USA) has published two case studies illustrating the benefits of using its construction cameras on large educational construction projects.

Cameras help monitor construction
Cameras help monitor construction

OxBlue (Atlanta, GA, USA) has published two case studies illustrating the benefits of using its construction cameras on large educational construction projects.

Two public universities, the University of Arkansas (Fayetteville, AR, USA) and the University of Iowa (Iowa City, IA, USA) initially chose to use the company’s construction webcams on their projects for public relations reasons.

In each case, investors and other key stakeholders, including the public, were given access so that they could watch the progress of the projects they had invested in. At both schools, those overseeing construction soon discovered that the cameras were a valuable tool for monitoring daily activity without physically having to be on the actual construction sites.

Project managers used the cameras to monitor progress and workflow, verify weather conditions at any given time, contact contractors when necessary and document their projects from start to finish.

OxBlue supplied each institution with a complete turnkey solution, including camera hardware, cellular data connections, servers, software and time-lapse movie production expertise.

The full text of the case studies can be found here.

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