phoenix|x-ray unveils back-end inspection roadmap

JULY 19--Driven by increasing package density and device complexity, as well as continued shrinking geometries, phoenix|x-ray (Camarillo, CA; www.phoenix-xray.com) has launched its comprehensive back-end x-ray inspection technology roadmap, identifying magnification and focal-spot size as key issues facing today's requirements for verification of complex packages.

JULY 19--Driven by increasing package density and device complexity, as well as continued shrinking geometries, phoenix|x-ray (Camarillo, CA; www.phoenix-xray.com) has launched its comprehensive back-end x-ray inspection technology roadmap, identifying magnification and focal-spot size as key issues facing today's requirements for verification of complex packages. In support of the roadmap, phoenix|x-ray has already launched the OVHM4 (Oblique View at Highest Magnification), a new dual detector module combining a conventional image intensifier and contrast sensitive image detector. The new tool is based on OVHM technology and is capable of generating multiple-angle real-time x-ray images of the same sample with both detectors offering an infinitely adjustable penetration angle. This allows the operator to quickly detect failures in bonding and inspect the number and size of voids all in one system.

"Since the early 1980s, when x-ray equipment was predominantly used in electronics manufacturing, a simple top-down view was sufficient," stated phoenix|x-ray president Adrian Wilson. "This technique is no longer meeting the requirements to inspect today's complex packages, and the complexity has created an excellent opportunity for our company. The new OVHM4 tool not only sets a higher standard for precision inspection but also offers the freedom and flexibility required in today's environment."

As part of the roadmap, phoenix|x-ray identified nanofocus technology as back-end inspection's most critical technology, as it allows real-time images of less than 1 μm. Its predecessor, microfocus, is only capable of images with a resolution of a few microns. Today's advanced packaging types, particularly those using microvias within the substrate and some flip-chip technologies, require greater magnification and focal spot size than can be offered by microfocus technology.

phoenix|x-ray launched the its first nanofocus tool in 2001 and will introduce its second nanofocus series later this year to meet the demand for this transition to nano-focus technology. While micro-focus will still be used for many applications, phoenix|x-ray believes that a combination of the technologies is where the industry is heading, creating the need for more innovative and flexible product introductions.

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