Technology advances

dpiX Inc. (Palo Alto, CA) has developed a digital imaging system that eliminates the need for x-ray film in many radiographic and nondestructive-test applications. Based on advanced amorphous-silicon technology, the FlashScan 30 subsystem provides an active imaging area of 12 16 in. (30 by 40 cm) that closely approximates the 14 17-in. standard size for chest films and is impervious to high-energy radiation. Its 12-bit gray-scale produces more than 4000 gray levels. . . . Varian Imaging Produc

Technology advances

dpiX Inc. (Palo Alto, CA) has developed a digital imaging system that eliminates the need for x-ray film in many radiographic and nondestructive-test applications. Based on advanced amorphous-silicon technology, the FlashScan 30 subsystem provides an active imaging area of 12 16 in. (30 by 40 cm) that closely approximates the 14 17-in. standard size for chest films and is impervious to high-energy radiation. Its 12-bit gray-scale produces more than 4000 gray levels. . . . Varian Imaging Products (Palo Alto, CA) claims to have developed the first real-time, digital, x-ray fluoroscopic imager, the VIP-9-QR/1, for industrial, scientific, and medical applications. Its proprietary large-area-sensing technology uses amorphous-silicon-based receptors that replace x-ray film. The 15-lb receptors replace the existing 100-lb image intensifier and TV camera, enabling fluoroscopic and radiographic imaging systems that are 90% smaller and 85% lighter. . . . Advanced Vision Technologies Inc. (Rochester, NY) has developed an innovative FED-type flat-panel-display (FPD) technology that is expected to produce thinner, brighter, and higher resolution displays. The display design integrates low-voltage, thin-film phosphors on silicon, glass, or ceramic substrates using existing fabrication equipment, which saves costs. It allows variations in the size of the pixels, permitting 50 to 6000 pixels/in. for use in all segments of the FDP market. . . . Analog Devices Inc. (Norwood, MA) is claiming that its ADSP-2183 digital-signal processor (DSP) is approximately 50% smaller than any available DSP. Available in a 144-ball chip-array package measuring one square centimeter in area and 1.25 mm high, the ADFSP-2183 operates at 3 V and delivers 29 MIPS. . . . SGS-Thomson Microelectronics (St. Genis, France) has developed two integrated circuits (ICs) that will enable designers to create a complete global-positioning-satellite (GPS) navigation imaging system on a card the size of a large pos

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