Compressive imagers improve light-field imaging

To address limitations in light-field imaging, researchers are taking a series of measurements—scanning in either the angular or spatial dimension—to synthesize a higher-resolution light field.

Traditional light-field imagers such as the plenoptic camera and the integral imager suffer from an inherent spatio-angular resolution trade-off that typically results in low-resolution measurements. This trade-off is one of the main hurdles in extending light-field imaging to a wider class of applications such as 3-D photography and 3-D microscopy. To address this problem, researchers may make a series of measurements—scanning in either the angular or spatial dimension—to synthesize a higher-resolution light field. However, these sampling approaches require a large number of measurements over a longer exposure time, which is undesirable in many applications.

Researchers Amit Ashok and Mark Neifeld at the University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ, USA) are developing a class of compressive light-field imagers that achieves compression in either the spatial or angular dimension of a light field. They believe that employing a hybrid measurement basis will help to extend the application of compressive light-field imagers to a wider class of natural scenes.

For more informaiton, read the full article from SPIE.

Posted by Vision Systems Design

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