Digital-imaging file format is proposed as standard

Established as an open industry consortium created to expand the use of digital images across consumer, business, and professional imaging markets and applications, the Digital Imaging Group (DIG) has submitted a file format for the JPEG (Joint Photographic Experts Group) 2000 image-compression system to the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) working group in charge of Coding Still Pictures for consideration as a digital imaging standard. The proposal incorporates key elements

Digital-imaging file format is proposed as standard

Established as an open industry consortium created to expand the use of digital images across consumer, business, and professional imaging markets and applications, the Digital Imaging Group (DIG) has submitted a file format for the JPEG (Joint Photographic Experts Group) 2000 image-compression system to the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) working group in charge of Coding Still Pictures for consideration as a digital imaging standard. The proposal incorporates key elements of DIG`s Flashpix file format, JPEG 2000`s image-compression technology, and wavelet technology.

Says Alexis Gerard, DIG president and executive director, "The DIG perceives the establishing of standards as a key enabler to the growth of the digital imaging industry. JPEG 2000`s acceptance of our proposal would lead to the creation of a superior imaging standard that would benefit both developers and consumers."

In preparing its proposal, the DIG combined major technologies from the Flashpix file format, such as unambiguous color definitions and strong meta-data support, with other international and de facto standards to establish a new format that could facilitate the use of JPEG 2000 image-coding data.

The resultant file format would permit users to load images faster with high resolution in files smaller than current JPEG files. In addition, the new file format would simplify the transmission of images over the bandwidth-limited Internet. It would also allow users access to only as much of an image as needed while maintaining the integrity of the original image.

Comments Daniel T. Lee of Hewlett-Packard Co., head of the ISO JPEG committee, "We look forward to working together with the DIG as this technology effort moves forward." The JPEG 2000 committee is expected to issue its recommendations in March 1999.

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