Software automates brain image analysis

A startup company from Oxford University (Oxford, UK) has developed software that analyzes CT scans from stroke victims, putting the expertise of a stroke assessment team into the hands of any doctor in an emergency room.

Mar 13th, 2013
Software automates brain image analysis
Software automates brain image analysis

A startup company from Oxford University (Oxford, UK) has developed software that analyzes CT scans from stroke victims, putting the expertise of a stroke assessment team into the hands of any doctor in an emergency room.

Brainomix' (Oxford, UK) so-called e-ASPECTS software automates the Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) pioneered by Alastair Buchan, Professor of Stroke Medicine and Head of the Medical Sciences Division at the university to identify and quantify signs of stroke.

Over the last 12 years, ASPECTS has been adopted worldwide. The original ASPECTS system relies on a scoring system to assess the CT scans but requires a stroke expert to gauge the images.

The automated e-ASPECTS system, on the other hand, encapsulates the expertise of Professor Buchan and his team in software that automatically analyses of the CT images, giving a score that can be used by any doctor to assist in deciding on what intervention should be used to treat a patient.

Professor Buchan initially developed ASPECTS to enable objective stroke assessment using CT scanning instead of using the more expensive, time consuming and less accessible magnetic resonance imaging.

Start-up Brainomix is led by Managing Director, Dr. Michalis Papadakis, along with co-founders Professors Iris Grunwald and Alastair Buchan.

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-- Dave Wilson, Senior Editor, Vision Systems Design

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