Edmund Optics grant program now open for entries

Edmund Optics {EO, Barrington, NJ, USA) is now accepting applications for its 2013 higher education grant program.

Edmund Optics grant program now open for entries
Edmund Optics grant program now open for entries

Edmund Optics (EO, Barrington, NJ, USA) is now accepting applications for its 2013 higher education grant program.

The company will be awarding grants worldwide totaling $85,000 in products in support of outstanding undergraduate and graduate optics programs in science, technology, engineering and mathematics at non-profit colleges and universities.

"It's easy to apply and I would encourage anyone involved in a project using optics, optomechanics or imaging components at a non-profit college or university to do so," says Kirsten Bjork-Jones, Director of Global Marketing Communications at Edmund Optics.

To apply for an EO grant, visit the EO web page here and click on the "Apply Now" button. The application requests information about you, the research project in which you are involved, and the types of products you would select if your program were awarded a grant.

The process for selecting grant winners is determined by the EO grant team. After a thorough review of applications, finalists are selected and asked to provide more detailed information about their programs. Grant recipients are then selected based on technical merit and innovative use of optics in a research setting or lab.

The application deadline is June 30, 2013, and finalists will be announced on July 24, 2013. Winning grant award recipients will be announced on September 4, 2013.

Related articles from Vision Systems Design that you might also find of interest.

1. Working with lenses beyond the visible

In choosing a lens for shortwave-infrared (SWIR) imaging, system integrators must weigh a number of important lens characteristics.

2. Leverage lenses for better vision

As with many tasks involved with choosing OEM components for machine-vision systems, deciding on which lens to specify for a given application can be challenging. Although the optical fundamentals of how lenses may perform are well documented, manufacturers are often unwilling to divulge even the basic characteristics of their products.

3. Use wavelength to your advantage in high-resolution imaging

By tailoring the wavelength of light, resolution, contrast, and depth of field of an imaging system can be increased.

-- Dave Wilson, Senior Editor, Vision Systems Design

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